September272014

brownandwhat:

Vine - Sadia Arabia

Ooooooh the double standard…

lol vine 

September262014
“Isn’t it beautiful?

How we find God
when we lose
ourselves?

Isn’t He beautiful?

The Creator of
the stars and
you and I.” Aisha Iqbal (via aestheticintrovert)

(via corporatepoet)

poetry 

September252014
two-browngirls:

AMBREEN SADIQ - ONE OF BRITAIN’S FIRST FEMALE MUSLIM BOXERS
I loved this recent article on boxer, Ambreen Sadiq. Not only has she fought and won numerous fights in the ring but she’s fought through the prejudice that some of her family members have about her profession. 
After appearing in the local newspapers and a Channel 4 documentary about her journey, Ambreen faced criticism and even death threats from men and women in the Muslim community. But she says that it isn’t the religion that causes the problem… 
““A lot of Muslim people say it’s about religion,” she says. “But I think it’s more about the culture and how people have been brought up. Men and women are treated equally [in the religion]. In the culture, it’s like the women should be at home cooking tea. The men put the food on the table.”
Now Ambreen’s story has been transformed into a play that is featuring at Edinburgh Festival - ‘No Guts, No Heart, No Glory’ check out the trailer here:

“It’s great that I can get my story out there,” says Sadiq. She wants to spread the message that Muslim girls can do whatever they want – whether dance, ballet, boxing, or football. “I think girls should be doing anything they want to be doing,” she insists.
 - S

two-browngirls:

AMBREEN SADIQ - ONE OF BRITAIN’S FIRST FEMALE MUSLIM BOXERS

I loved this recent article on boxer, Ambreen Sadiq. Not only has she fought and won numerous fights in the ring but she’s fought through the prejudice that some of her family members have about her profession. 

After appearing in the local newspapers and a Channel 4 documentary about her journey, Ambreen faced criticism and even death threats from men and women in the Muslim community. But she says that it isn’t the religion that causes the problem… 

“A lot of Muslim people say it’s about religion,” she says. “But I think it’s more about the culture and how people have been brought up. Men and women are treated equally [in the religion]. In the culture, it’s like the women should be at home cooking tea. The men put the food on the table.”

Now Ambreen’s story has been transformed into a play that is featuring at Edinburgh Festival - ‘No Guts, No Heart, No Glory’ check out the trailer here:

“It’s great that I can get my story out there,” says Sadiq. She wants to spread the message that Muslim girls can do whatever they want – whether dance, ballet, boxing, or football. “I think girls should be doing anything they want to be doing,” she insists.

- S

(via camair-me-manque)

September242014
androphilia:

Female Protesters Calling For The Release Of Angela Davis From Prison, Xamar (Mogadishu), Somalia, 1972

androphilia:

Female Protesters Calling For The Release Of Angela Davis From Prison, Xamar (Mogadishu), Somalia, 1972

(via xeraq)

September232014

fr muslim girls who considered suicide when the ummah wasnt enuf

zanzoobamagdoos:

fr mariam , khadijah, fatima, hajar, alla , yall,

fr our communities that hold us, 

recite algebraic formulas against evil eye

2 × al fatiha plus 3 astaghfirallahs =

your eyelashes wont fall out

written with such love and concern

fr when we struggle w them

against islamophobia , 

racism , the revolution

do our dawah n make

dua fr you, me, the deen

thinkin abt the dirty linen

we spent all night

folding with our teeth clenched…

this is fr the muslim girls who are nvr

gna marry  

fr the ones who infuse their every day

w islam but still 

arent muslim enuf fr

the ummah

fr the ones who cldnt wake up

to pray because they cldnt

get out of bed

fr the ones who feel like khadijah would understand their hustle but that imam jones wont, fr the ones wearing hijab because its easier than not, the ones who want to and the ones who are tired of talking about it all again, 

the ones in the short skirts and the ones in the lime green abayas , fr the ones in all black, fr the ones who know how to cover up a black eye before the halaqa, 

fr the times we wondered if rape counts as zina, and if it’s double sins because it happened inside the ummah,  

fr the ones who cut themselves open to feel sumthin already lost

fr the ones who skip prayers to smoke, who dont pray unless reciting al fatiha during sex , fr the ones who dont want to talk abt sex 

the ones holding hands in the mall, not bc theyre cuzins but cuzz they find luv in it, the ones who find revelation in the lines of their sweaty palms after reading poetry, playing music, singin more than nasheeds

this is fr the muslim girls who want more than taqwacore, who are stuck somewhere between gnawan night visions in moroccan dance clubs, beanpies n biryani street corners, the ones struggling to fuse worlds apart into peace be upon you and pieces be into me

the ones who experience violence

bt never said alhamdulillah

who arent humble or thankful or patient

fr the ones who are sick of ur shit

bt are too exhausted to say it

we survive on intimacy and inshallah’s,

our spirits are too ancient to understand

the separation of god n growth, 

my faith is too delicate to have thrown back on my face, my faith is

too beautiful to have thrown back on my face, my faith 

is too raw to have thrown back on my

face, my faith is too magnificent to have

thrown back on my face, my faith

is too magical to have

thrown back on my face,

my faith is too pure. 

too mine,

too nuthin,

too everythin, 

to us,

to have thrown

back on my

face

-ameen

(via kawrage)

September222014
modeststreetfashion:

Sydney, Australia just teaching the rest of the world a thing or two about fashion. Colors, Textures, mixed print. All I can really say is take note! Extraordinary!
Sydney, AustraliaBy: langstonhues
#modeststreetfashion #modestfashion

modeststreetfashion:

Sydney, Australia just teaching the rest of the world a thing or two about fashion. Colors, Textures, mixed print. All I can really say is take note! Extraordinary!

Sydney, Australia
By: langstonhues


#modeststreetfashion #modestfashion

September212014
“You want me to be a tragic backdrop so that you can appear to be illuminated, so that people can say ‘Wow, isn’t he so terribly brave to love a girl who is so obviously sad?’ You think I’ll be the dark sky so you can be the star? I’ll swallow you whole.” Warsan Shire (via vrban)

(via theloupgaroux)

September202014

(Source: crustandsugar)

boxing 

September192014

Anonymous said: are hijabis really able to be proper feminists?

maarnayeri:

This is a really loaded ask packed with many dangerous presumptions, so I hope you weren’t expecting a simple yes or no. Also, before I even answer this (essentially insulting) question, it bears making the following disclaimers.

First, I don’t like the term hijabi deployed in most contexts, especially with regards to feminism, because it creates this insidious isolation of an entire demographic. Let us not pathologize human beings in such a way. Only a bigoted fool would honestly believe that by the virtue of practicing Islam and wearing a headscarf could a vast myriad of women from different political backgrounds, races/nationalities, social environments, economic brackets and their thoughts about women’s liberation be compiled under such a homogenous label. Ironically, attempting to validate such a stigmatization of millions of women itself is a decidedly anti feminist and fundamentally misogynistic act. (For the record, if a woman who wears hijab refers to herself as such, that’s entirely her right, but that’s not a title that should be imposed on her, which was done here).

Secondly, the idea that any woman has to unconditionally identify with feminism as a structure to prove herself credible is stifling and harmful. There are many justifications for women, especially women who are marginalized racially or by heteronormative standards not to identify with American mainstream feminism (which is generally understood as the three waves of feminism and were/are transparently flawed). For example, the formation of second wave feminism was so white centered and racially alienating that it provided as part of the reason Black American women created womanism, which aligned itself more with intersectionality. But for argument’s sake, I’ll assume by “feminist”, you mean general euphemism for women who are principled in their analysis and approaches to gendered oppression.

I have to wonder what your idea of a “proper” feminist must be if Muslim women who wear the hijab are actively alienated from it. Honestly, ask yourself. Because you didn’t say Muslim women as a whole, so is it the concept of veiling that perturbs you? Or perhaps you didn’t know that there are Muslim women who don’t wear the hijab? But then it seems to be only Muslim women who observe head scarves that you make a point to interrogate, because there are women of different faiths outside of Islam that don a veil and yet, they are not speculated about in the same manner.

It sounds to me that there two possible outcomes to have resulted in this question.

One, you might believe that women who wear the hijab do so in spite of other women and perpetually sneer at those who are understood as dressing “provocatively”. To your apparent dismay, there are hijab wearing Muslim women who regard their clothing choices as a personal act and do not wish to impose it on others. Simultaneously, there are liberal feminists (FEMEN and less extreme variations) that believe that publicly embracing sexuality and viewing it as a means of liberation (which is patently false and not to mention, alienates women who not wish to be open about sexuality in such a manner) who are so dogmatic in their beliefs that they consider covering up (especially and at times, primarily in the context of Islam) to be an innate form of oppression and subsequently anti feminist. This is not only incorrect, it lends way to legitimizing racism and Islamophobia as a feminist stance, which leads to my following point.

Two, you could believe that by the virtue of observing the hijab, a woman is so oppressed that she cannot possibly be in the position to have profound feminist views and praxis. This assumption occurs under a presupposed mythical conditional misogyny and a singular form of oppression. This stance, by its very core obscures the nature of sexism. To assume this line of thinking is to deliberately erase the oppression faced by women in so called “sexually liberated” spaces and locations. Whether it be pornography where rape and abuse have become nearly indistinguishable from the act of sex itself and the objectification of women’s bodies normalized or the proliferation of rape culture where a woman dressing in a particular fashion becomes the topic of speculation, rather than the commonality of sexual assault itself, women are scrutinized. By your own logic, women who have been subjected to the worst forms of misogynistic violence would not be credible voices either, but of course, you know better than that.

What seems to be lost on you, however is that women are a second class in almost every viable sector in most societies. Say it with me- patriarchy is a global force. This is by no turn the oppression faced by women into a uniformity, devoid of nuance by class, race, geopolitics and so forth. And neither would I ever deny the very specific narratives of women who wear the hijab (especially in a post 9/11 state where they’re so visibly Muslim- a narrative that I can’t speak about and won’t encroach upon). But my ultimate purpose is to reiterate that misogyny and hardship faced by women is indeed almost unanimously understood (there are only a small sector of women whose lives are made so comfortable by their other sociopolitical and economic privileges that they can evade the fundamental struggle of womanhood).

Pontification about the hijab is useless and demonizing. By questioning the legitimacy of millions of women’s political views and the how they can improve the lives of themselves and their fellow women by such an arbitrary standard is pompous navel gazing. So, tldr, to answer your very trite and unyieldingly orientalistic question “can a hijabi be a proper feminist?” Yes. And no. It depends on the views they hold, ways they enact such views and if they feel comfortable associating with the term feminism. Just like another classification of woman.

September182014

(Source: naomicampbelle, via shabaash)

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