June252013

Farah Chamma - “How Must I Believe?”

April42013

A chat with thehijabstylist (by dababmedia)

Follow @thehijabstylist on Instagram and Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/hijabstylist

November132012
“Dear White People, I have something to say. This morning I did not wake up to prove to you my right to exist. I did not wake up to answer your questions about where I’m ‘from’ or where I’m ‘from from’ and to explain to you why my families country of origin is not found on a map. I did not wake up this morning thinking, hmm, I should really let everybody know whether I’m more American or more Arab, or to prove to you my patriotism. I am not a walking political newscaster, here to answer to you at the drop of a hat questions about distant brown people. I am not a monolithic brown girl. No I don’t speak Afghani and no, it’s not the same as Arabic. I don’t give a shit about Saudi Arabia, and I cant point to you the exact page in the Qur’an where it says it’s okay to beat your wife. This morning I woke up and went to work. I answered your questions with a semi smile about ‘my’ God (wait, who is Allah then?), and my hijab, and I answered your questions about hummus. I do not exist merely for your questions. I am not an embodiment of whatever answers I give you. I am pissed. I don’t have an identity crisis, or maybe I do. But no, you don’t have the right to know every facet of my being. Sometimes brown people are allowed to just ‘be’ too. Dear white people, you are not the standard to which I define myself. I did not wake up this morning to be interrogated, and I don’t care if you’re at ease with any of my answers. You do not have ownership over my existence. With or without your acceptance, I exist. I’m tired of trying to prove that.”

Dear White People… | Marwa Sami

A powerful post by a dear friend of mine.

September272012
“Lady Khadija was a great teacher; she has such a Maqaam in our religion. She taught the Prophet ﷺ who he was; she was the one who elevated him in his esteem. When he had self doubt she said no. You can see that when the Prophet ﷺ married Lady Aisha he had no fear of strong women. There are a lot of men who fear strong women, who want them to be wallflowers. Whereas with the Prophet ﷺ, that’s not the type of people he encouraged. His wives were women who talked back, and the reason he wasn’t afraid was because khadija was his first wife. She was a women of the world. She knew the world, and she was completely self confident. That’s a sunnah of our Prophet ﷺ, to elevate women.” Hamza Yusuf  (via zuleikha)

(Source: , via zuleikha-deactivated20121202)

May272012
“It is no coincidence that so many in the West are affronted by Muslim women’s veils: they symbolise the last refusal of Islamic cultures to be stripped and consumed by the Western narcissistic gaze.”

The dignity of the feminine in Islam: Against Zizek’s Orientalism – Opinion – ABC Religion & Ethics (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

An interesting piece by Rachel Woodlock

January32012

Susan Carland’s view on the burqa ban in Australia on Qanda (by mizsay)

December92011
November192011
Meet Maytha Alhassen, a doctoral student in American Studies & Ethnicity, blogger, writer, Hijabi Monologues performer, Malcolm X researcher, co-editor of upcoming book on the Arab Spring and contributor to book I Speak For Myself. Check out Maytha’s personal website and USC page. Photo by RidzDesign (via Maytha Alhassen)

Meet Maytha Alhassen, a doctoral student in American Studies & Ethnicity, blogger, writer, Hijabi Monologues performer, Malcolm X researcher, co-editor of upcoming book on the Arab Spring and contributor to book I Speak For Myself. Check out Maytha’s personal website and USC page. Photo by RidzDesign (via Maytha Alhassen)

November182011
Muslim pilgrims climb a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia,on November 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar) (via The Hajj and Eid al-Adha 2011 - Alan Taylor - In Focus - The Atlantic)

Muslim pilgrims climb a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia,on November 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar) (via The Hajj and Eid al-Adha 2011 - Alan Taylor - In Focus - The Atlantic)

October162011
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